Consumers’ attitude towards GM food is based on their understanding of the science behind it

 Psychologists and biologists from the University of Rochester, the University of Amsterdam, and Cardiff University conducted a study to answer the question “Would consumers eat genetically modified food if they understand the science behind it?” The result of their study published in the Journal of Environmental Psychology says that the …

How potatoes could become sun worshippers

If there’s one thing potato plants don’t like, it’s heat. If the temperature is too high, potato plants form significantly lower numbers of tubers, or sometimes none at all. Biochemists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered the reason why. If the temperature rises, a so-called “small RNA” blocks the …

Iron-rich GM wheat set to undergo field trials

The John Innes Centre got the green light from the UK government to perform field trials of genetically modified (GM) wheat biofortified to produce high-iron white flour. The three-year field trial (from 2019 to 2022) will be carried out under confined conditions at the Centre between April and September each …

Plants as vegetarian source of Omega-3

Healthful oils derived from plants are processed by the human body in exactly the same manner as when fish oils are eaten, according to a research led by the University of Southampton’s Faculty of Medicine. Omega-3 fats are mainly present in fish oil and are vital for health and development. …

Salt tolerant rice variety developed in India

Scientists from India developed a salt tolerant transgenic rice variety which, under greenhouse conditions, showed normal growth and grain yield. The scientists used genes from the wild rice species Porteresia coarctata. This species, native to some parts of South Asia, is known to be a halophyte, thus a rich source …

New technologies show better details on GM plants

Researchers from the Salk Institute for biological studies, USA used the latest DNA sequencing technologies to study exactly what happens at a molecular level when new genes are inserted into plants. Scientists usually rely on Agrobacterium tumefaciens when they want to put a new gene into a plant. Decades ago, …

Researchers develop GM houseplants to clean air

Researchers at the University of Washington have genetically modified pothos ivy — a common houseplant — to help clean the air inside homes. Hazardous compounds such as chloroform and benzene build up in homes, and exposure to both compounds have been linked to cancer. The modified photos ivy removes chloroform …

Plants as efficient antifungal factories

Researchers report that they can efficiently produce antifungal proteins in plants based on a modified tobacco mosaic virus. The results of this research, which could have a major impact in the agri-food industry, have been published in the Plant Biotechnology Journal. The fungi that cause diseases in plants, animals and …